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While ACEF provides a cursory review of every article on the website, ACEF and the ACEF staff cannot guarantee the accuracy of the information contained in the articles. The ideas presented in the articles are not endorsed by ACEF, the Texas Center for Educational Facilities, Tarleton State University, or the US Department of Education. All articles are posted as presented in the original format.
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"No Cost" School Renovation
Zorn, R. L. (2006). 193 (5)

Ohio’s Poland Local School District recently completed $5.5 million in additions and upgrades at no cost to the taxpayers. How did they do it? The district entered into a multiyear energy performance contract that allows them to pay off their loan through the savings realized by the renovation itself.

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A High Performance School Case Study: Northern Guilford Middle School
Koh, B., & Nicklas, M. (2007).

This case study will introduce detailed information of each green strategy, for Northern Guilford Middle School, and how comprehensive strategies are well integrated into the project to stay within the budget.

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A Statewide Multiagency Intervention Model for Empowering Schools to Improve Indoor Environmental Quality
Foscue, K, & Harvey, M. (2011). 74 (2)

A multiagency consortium created and led by the Connecticut Department of Public Health has successfully implemented and continues to sustain the U.S. EPA's Tools for Schools program in the majority of Connecticut public schools. The authors present and analyze the consortium model and their efforts at evaluating the impact of Tools for Schools in Connecticut.

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A study into the effects of light on children of elementary school age - A case of daylight robbery
Hathaway, W. E., Hargreaves, J.A., Thompson, G.W., & Novitsky, D. (1992).

Based on a review of the literature and a pilot study conducted from 1981 to 1985, a study was carried out that examined physical development and school performance effects of different lighting systems on elementary students. Students’ dental health, growth and development, attendance, and academic achievement were examined under four different types of lighting: (a) full spectrum fluorescent lamps, (b) full spectrum fluorescent lamps with ultraviolet light enhancements, (c) cool white fluorescent lamps, and (d) high pressure sodium vapor lamps. Data on 327 students, in Grade 4 at the end of the 1986-87 school year, were collected at the start and at the conclusion of the study, which spanned two years. The results indicated that over the two year period, students under full spectrum fluorescent lamps with ultraviolet supplements developed fewer dental cavities and had better attendance, achievement, and growth and development than students under other lights. Students under the high pressure sodium vapor lamps had the slowest rates of growth and development as well as the poorest attendance and achievement. On the basis of the findings of this study it was concluded that lights have important non-visual effects on students who are exposed to them on a regular basis in classrooms.

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A Sustainable and Holistic Approach to Design and Construction.
Bobodilla, L. (2010). 76 (4)

Building energy-efficient school facilities is not just about being "green." It is about providing high-performance facilities that are safe, healthy, and conducive to learning. It is also about building facilities that are cost-effective from their inception and in the long term. Many school districts are working under ever-tightening budgets, so reduced operating costs are welcomed. With careful planning, facilities and construction departments can build schools that encourage learning, reduce long-term operating costs, and lessen the effect on the environment while controlling up-front construction costs. The keys are including staff as active participants in the process and using a holistic approach to facility design. Guilford County Schools in North Carolina is an example of a district that was able to build a high-performance school that continually saves money. Northern Guilford Middle School is a $20.7 million facility serving 1,030 students. At two years old, it is beginning to show the long-term benefits of energy efficiency with lower electric bills and reduced water use. The school district wanted to use taxpayer dollars wisely while building a sustainable facility and creating a three-dimensional learning experience for students. During the planning and construction of Northern Guilford, the district's facilities staff worked with the architects to develop a holistic design for the school, detailing how the lighting, heating, cooling, and other systems would work together in the building. School districts can construct efficient buildings and lower energy expenses without greater up-front costs. This article offers some points school districts should remember as they develop plans to build high performance schools.

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Breaking New Ground? Reflections on Greening School Grounds as Sites of Ecological, Pedagogical, and Social Transformations
Dyment, J. E. & Reid, A. (2005). 10

In this paper, the authors explore the greening initiatives in school grounds as sites where ecological, pedagogical, and social transformation might be promoted and take place. The authors reflect on their evaluations of school ground greening initiatives in Canada and England, in which they note the initiatives are often at the margins of young peoples' experiences in schools and that their potential to be transformative can go unrealized.

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Build a School, Inspire a Community
Bowen_Eggebraaten, M., & Hoffman, P. J. (2010). 76 (4)

When River Crest Elementary School opened on September 2, 2008, it was clear that the effect of a "green" school would extend beyond the students who walked through the doors for class each day. The 93,450-square-foot facility in Hudson, Wisconsin, serves as a catalyst for sustainable change and has been an educational tool for ecofriendly behavior in the community. River Crest's role goes beyond being "just a school" and offers a blueprint worthy of duplication. The Hudson School District Board of Education and administration chose to incorporate sustainability into the design and construction of their new elementary school. They knew it was the right thing to do. From this inaugural decision, they launched a green movement and commitment to sustainability. The enthusiasm expressed by River Crest staff, students, and parents spread across the district as greater emphasis was placed on learning about and practicing sustainability. The "tipping point" came as the Hudson community began to recognize River Crest as the standard or model for construction in the area. River Crest is the Hudson School District's sixth elementary school but its first to be designed and constructed using sustainability principles. This article describes a few of the sustainable highlights of the design and construction.

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Building for Academic Excellence: A Vision and Options to Address Deficient School Facilities in Baltimore City
American Civil Liberties Union of Maryland (2010).

This report, Buildings for Academic Excellence, urgently asks city, state, and federal officials, and the greater Baltimore community, to act now to improve the substandard physical condition of city school buildings. It is unacceptable - as well as unconstitutional - to deprive city students of adequate school facilities and an equal opportunity in education. The modernization of school buildings is integral to Baltimore’s education reform effort. To help both students and teachers succeed, state and city leaders must make school facility improvements a higher priority.

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Building Schools in a Tight Economy? Do Your Homework
Watts, C. (2010). 75 (4)

With unemployment rising and the public more concerned about the economy than at any other time in recent memory, the idea of a municipality deciding to spend millions of dollars to build or refurbish a school seems an uphill challenge to say the least. In the best of times, voter approval for school construction projects is difficult to get; during a recession, that difficult task seems all but impossible. But when a community's schools are too small for the population or their roofs are leaking and causing mold problems, a construction project cannot wait out the economy. As any teacher will tell, the secret to success is proper planning and homework so one has the right information when it is time to take the test. The same holds true for a municipality that is looking to build a new school or to undertake a significant renovation in this troubled economy. The task is not impossible; it just requires the building committee to do a little extra work to ensure that the project is correctly specified and budgeted. But often, municipalities do not do their homework on projects. One only needs to read the newspaper to see stories of towns encountering problems with their current building projects: towns with school construction projects running significantly over budget, "value engineering" to reduce costs on current projects, and postponing building, causing students to learn in crowded or damaged classrooms. In this article, Charles W. Boos, CEO of Kaestle Boos Associates, an architectural firm that specializes in municipal construction projects throughout New England, offers tips to avoid such problems when looking to build or renovate a school.

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Child Care Facilities: Quality by Design
Proscio, T., Sussman, C., & Gillman, A. (2004).

Child Care Facilities: Quality by Design, published by LISC’s Community Investment Collaborative for Kids (CICK). Discussions about the quality of child care most often revolve around what takes place inside any given child care center: curriculum and program content, adult-child ratios, teacher qualifications, and so on. Yet many of those factors -- and ultimately, the quality of care in general – depend in no small part on the design of the center. This report describes the interaction between building design and the quality of child care, offering details of efforts to create well-designed facilities in communities served by LISC across the country.

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