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While TCEF provides a cursory review of every article on the website, TCEF and the TCEF staff cannot guarantee the accuracy of the information contained in the articles. The ideas presented in the articles are not endorsed by TCEF, the Texas Center for Educational Facilities, Tarleton State University, or the US Department of Education. All articles are posted as presented in the original format.
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"No Cost" School Renovation
Zorn, R. L. (2006). 193 (5)

Ohio’s Poland Local School District recently completed $5.5 million in additions and upgrades at no cost to the taxpayers. How did they do it? The district entered into a multiyear energy performance contract that allows them to pay off their loan through the savings realized by the renovation itself.

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‘This place could help you learn’: student participation in creating better school environments
Flutter, J. (2006).

This paper examines the role of student consultation and participation in the process of improving the physical environment in schools. Although quantitative studies suggest that there are some links between the learning environment and school performance, direct causal relationships between these factors remain unclear. However, as Clark points out: ‘… qualitative research on the indirect influences of school buildings on student learning and behavior is of use in enhancing our understanding of the factors involved’ (Clark, 2002, p. 11). Evidence from qualitative studies of students' perspectives on the school environment is presented to illustrate the important insights that can be gained through listening to the student voice. The argument for student voice is taken further through a discussion of recent projects and initiatives in which students are given an active role in designing and improving school buildings and facilities. The paper concludes with a discussion of the problems and benefits in involving students in the process of improving their learning environments.

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14 Severe Weather Survival Tips
Satterly, S. (2012). Retrieval Location

This article is a refresher of current best practices for tornado sheltering for schools, as well as an explanation of why they have become best practices. The process to change protocals so changes are made in a thoughtful and logical manner are described.

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2001 College Construction Report
Abramson, P. (2001).

In 1997, colleges and universities in the United States put just less than $5.8b worth on construction in place. This report identifies new construction to be completed, starts, retrofits, additions, etc. in the college and university setting across the U.S. for 2001.

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A biosecurity checklist for school foodservice programs: Developing a biosecurity management plan
United States Department of Agriculture, Food and Nutrition Service (2003). (FNS-364)

The U.S. Department of Agriculture, Food and Nutrition Service (FNS), has prepared A Biosecurity Checklist for School Foodservice Programs: Developing a Biosecurity Management Plan. This booklet presents a wide array of guidelines and suggestions on how to: 1) form a school foodservice biosecurity management team; 2) use the checklist to prioritize measures to strengthen biosecurity inside and outside the primary foodservice area; and 3) create a school foodservice biosecurity management plan.

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A study into the effects of light on children of elementary school age - A case of daylight robbery
Hathaway, W. E., Hargreaves, J.A., Thompson, G.W., & Novitsky, D. (1992).

Based on a review of the literature and a pilot study conducted from 1981 to 1985, a study was carried out that examined physical development and school performance effects of different lighting systems on elementary students. Students’ dental health, growth and development, attendance, and academic achievement were examined under four different types of lighting: (a) full spectrum fluorescent lamps, (b) full spectrum fluorescent lamps with ultraviolet light enhancements, (c) cool white fluorescent lamps, and (d) high pressure sodium vapor lamps. Data on 327 students, in Grade 4 at the end of the 1986-87 school year, were collected at the start and at the conclusion of the study, which spanned two years. The results indicated that over the two year period, students under full spectrum fluorescent lamps with ultraviolet supplements developed fewer dental cavities and had better attendance, achievement, and growth and development than students under other lights. Students under the high pressure sodium vapor lamps had the slowest rates of growth and development as well as the poorest attendance and achievement. On the basis of the findings of this study it was concluded that lights have important non-visual effects on students who are exposed to them on a regular basis in classrooms.

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Achievement by Design
Black, S. (2007).

Buildings and classrooms play a role in how students learn, but while amenities are nice, don't let the frills overshadow your district's instructional goals.

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Best practices for radon measurement in Minnesota schools and commercial buildings
Minnesota Department of Health (2013).

This document is intended to assist school oficials and consultants to design and implement a radon testing program through: • Planning • Communication • Initial measurements • Follow-up measurements • Reduction verification • Future testing

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Building a disaster-resistant university
Federal Emergency Management Agency (2003). (EPA 402-F-03-012)

This document is both a how-to guide and a distillation of the experiences of six universities and colleges across the country that have been working over the past several years to become more disaster-resistant.

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Buildings and Infrastructure Protection Series. Primer to Design Safe School Projects in Case of Terrorist Attacks
US Dept. of Homeland Security (2012).

A new publication series, aimed at engineers, architects, building owners, city planners, and emergency managers, makes available years of government, industry, and academic research on designs and materials to make buildings and tunnels terror-resistant and terror-resilient. The Building and Infrastructure Protection Series (BIPS) provides architects and engineers a set of aids for designing critical infrastructure to withstand all kinds of hazards…at a cost that won’t break the budget. “This series lays the foundation for designing a new generation of resilient buildings,” says Mila Kennett, who oversees the series in S&T’s Infrastructure Protection and Disaster Management Division, where she leads the Structural Resilience Branch. An architect by training, Kennett came from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), where she edited a similar publication series after 9/11. Several of the BIPS guides expand upon and update her highly regarded FEMA guides The primer provides school designers and administrators a set of guidelines to design a school where children, faculty and staff will be safe during a physical attack or targeted shooting.

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