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While TCEF provides a cursory review of every article on the website, TCEF and the TCEF staff cannot guarantee the accuracy of the information contained in the articles. The ideas presented in the articles are not endorsed by TCEF, the Texas Center for Educational Facilities, Tarleton State University, or the US Department of Education. All articles are posted as presented in the original format.
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‘This place could help you learn’: student participation in creating better school environments
Flutter, J. (2006).

This paper examines the role of student consultation and participation in the process of improving the physical environment in schools. Although quantitative studies suggest that there are some links between the learning environment and school performance, direct causal relationships between these factors remain unclear. However, as Clark points out: ‘… qualitative research on the indirect influences of school buildings on student learning and behavior is of use in enhancing our understanding of the factors involved’ (Clark, 2002, p. 11). Evidence from qualitative studies of students' perspectives on the school environment is presented to illustrate the important insights that can be gained through listening to the student voice. The argument for student voice is taken further through a discussion of recent projects and initiatives in which students are given an active role in designing and improving school buildings and facilities. The paper concludes with a discussion of the problems and benefits in involving students in the process of improving their learning environments.

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14 Severe Weather Survival Tips
Satterly, S. (2012). Retrieval Location

This article is a refresher of current best practices for tornado sheltering for schools, as well as an explanation of why they have become best practices. The process to change protocals so changes are made in a thoughtful and logical manner are described.

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30 Strategies to Education Reform
Nair, P. (2003).

The 30 strategies for education reform discussed in this guidebook, taken together, represent a new, alternative, education model. The guidebook is written to close some big gaps in education -- the gap between research and action, between stated goals and policy, and between perception and reality.

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6 Design Principles to Set the Stage for Learning
O'Donnell, S. (2008).

Learning environments provide students with a 'stage' to perform. The article provides six recommendations to set the stage for learning. Different classroom environments have shown to positively affect activities in classrooms.

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A biosecurity checklist for school foodservice programs: Developing a biosecurity management plan
United States Department of Agriculture, Food and Nutrition Service (2003). (FNS-364)

The U.S. Department of Agriculture, Food and Nutrition Service (FNS), has prepared A Biosecurity Checklist for School Foodservice Programs: Developing a Biosecurity Management Plan. This booklet presents a wide array of guidelines and suggestions on how to: 1) form a school foodservice biosecurity management team; 2) use the checklist to prioritize measures to strengthen biosecurity inside and outside the primary foodservice area; and 3) create a school foodservice biosecurity management plan.

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A Case Study on Facility Design: The Impact of New High School Facilities in Virginia on Student Achievement and Staff Attitudes and Behaviors
Bishop, M. E. (2009).

This case study involved the examination of three new high schools that opened in the Commonwealth of Virginia between 2006 and 2007. Principal interviews and focus group interviews were conducted between April and June 2008. Document analysis of architectural information was conducted by the researcher for each site location; that analysis yielded shared characteristics of the sites such as floor plans, common professional work areas, use of safety features, and the use of natural lighting throughout instructional and professional spaces. The study determined that the perceptions of the principals and the staff of these new buildings were shared and sufficiently common for identification. The data collected from both groups of participants indicated the existence of three shared themes particular to this case study: improved student behaviors, improved staff and student morale, and a lack of belief that the new buildings had more positively impacted student achievement than had the old buildings. Additionally, data collected from participants in this study seemed to represent acknowledgement of a relationship between sustainable design elements and student achievement as well as student and staff behaviors. All respondents in both interview groups agreed that the amount of natural light incorporated into the design of the building had a positive impact on both student and staff behaviors, indicating that it may have positively impacted student achievement. At all three locations, participants expressed a shared belief that natural light had affected their overall performance, their individual moods, and, in some cases, their ability to maintain their levels of performance as the year progressed. Other factors mentioned by all participants as having had a positive impact included the following: open space in classrooms and hallways, the high ceilings and sense of openness in all the buildings, and enhanced safety and security features present in the buildings. All of the data collected from the participants in this research study led to the conclusion of the researcher that design elements such as natural lighting and climate controlled HVAC systems, as well as wide, open hallways and shared student spaces, do positively impact student behaviors and student and staff attitudes and behaviors.

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A Gender Perspective on Educational Facilities
Lang, S. (2010).

This article explores the planning and design of educational facilities from a gender perspective, with a view to guiding future research and policy analysis.

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A guide to school vulnerability assessments
U.S. Department of Education, Office of Safe and Drug Free Schools (2008). (ED-04-CO-0091)

This guide is intended to be a companion piece to Practical Information on Crisis Planning: A Guide for Schools and Communities, originally published by the U.S. Department of Education in 2003 as a guide for schools and districts to prepare for a variety of crises. This new guide, published by the U.S. Department of Education in 2008, emphasizes a valuable part of emergency management planning-ongoing vulnerability assessment-and is intended to assist schools with the implementation of an effective vulnerability assessment process, to include choosing an appropriate vulnerability assessment tool. This guide is not intended to be prescriptive or to give step-by-step instructions for conducting assessments, rather it is intended to describe the key elements to be considered when selecting an assessment tool appropriate for school environments and provide guidance for conducting an assessment that will inform school emergency management activities.

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A High Performance School Case Study: Northern Guilford Middle School
Koh, B., & Nicklas, M. (2007).

This case study will introduce detailed information of each green strategy, for Northern Guilford Middle School, and how comprehensive strategies are well integrated into the project to stay within the budget.

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A Problem Based Learning Project Analyzing State Assessment Instruments Used for School Facilities
Barnes, R. A., Chandler, J. W., & Thomsen, B. (2011).

This doctoral team project describes the findings from a problem-based learning project of school facility assessment standards. The project team reviewed literature related to facility standards in Missouri, facility standards in other states, and legislation related to facility standards. The team studied the relationship between school facilities and achievement. The focus was narrowed to the policy problem of Missouri lacking definitive facility standards. By studying the relationship between facilities and achievement, safety and liability, adequacy standards, obstacles to adequate facilities, state funding, and maintenance criteria, the team was able to have a baseline as it began to compare Missouri to other states. At the beginning, the research of other states policies relating to school facility assessments and the information studied provided a direction to make recommendations concerning Missouri and its lack of a policy for facility standards. The team answered three guiding questions which dealt with Missouri's need for a facility assessment tool and identified four recommendations. These recommendations were the State of Missouri should: (1) develop and mandate standards for school facilities, (2) develop and adopt an assessment standards tool, (3) develop an accountability system for assessing facilities and lastly, and (4) develop and mandate a financial system to help schools fund facility deficiency improvements.

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