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While TCEF provides a cursory review of every article on the website, TCEF and the TCEF staff cannot guarantee the accuracy of the information contained in the articles. The ideas presented in the articles are not endorsed by TCEF, the Texas Center for Educational Facilities, Tarleton State University, or the US Department of Education. All articles are posted as presented in the original format.
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"No Cost" School Renovation
Zorn, R. L. (2006). 193 (5)

Ohio’s Poland Local School District recently completed $5.5 million in additions and upgrades at no cost to the taxpayers. How did they do it? The district entered into a multiyear energy performance contract that allows them to pay off their loan through the savings realized by the renovation itself.

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‘This place could help you learn’: student participation in creating better school environments
Flutter, J. (2006).

This paper examines the role of student consultation and participation in the process of improving the physical environment in schools. Although quantitative studies suggest that there are some links between the learning environment and school performance, direct causal relationships between these factors remain unclear. However, as Clark points out: ‘… qualitative research on the indirect influences of school buildings on student learning and behavior is of use in enhancing our understanding of the factors involved’ (Clark, 2002, p. 11). Evidence from qualitative studies of students' perspectives on the school environment is presented to illustrate the important insights that can be gained through listening to the student voice. The argument for student voice is taken further through a discussion of recent projects and initiatives in which students are given an active role in designing and improving school buildings and facilities. The paper concludes with a discussion of the problems and benefits in involving students in the process of improving their learning environments.

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14 Severe Weather Survival Tips
Satterly, S. (2012). Retrieval Location

This article is a refresher of current best practices for tornado sheltering for schools, as well as an explanation of why they have become best practices. The process to change protocals so changes are made in a thoughtful and logical manner are described.

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30 Strategies to Education Reform
Nair, P. (2003).

The 30 strategies for education reform discussed in this guidebook, taken together, represent a new, alternative, education model. The guidebook is written to close some big gaps in education -- the gap between research and action, between stated goals and policy, and between perception and reality.

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6 Design Principles to Set the Stage for Learning
O'Donnell, S. (2008).

Learning environments provide students with a 'stage' to perform. The article provides six recommendations to set the stage for learning. Different classroom environments have shown to positively affect activities in classrooms.

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A Case Study on Facility Design: The Impact of New High School Facilities in Virginia on Student Achievement and Staff Attitudes and Behaviors
Bishop, M. E. (2009).

This case study involved the examination of three new high schools that opened in the Commonwealth of Virginia between 2006 and 2007. Principal interviews and focus group interviews were conducted between April and June 2008. Document analysis of architectural information was conducted by the researcher for each site location; that analysis yielded shared characteristics of the sites such as floor plans, common professional work areas, use of safety features, and the use of natural lighting throughout instructional and professional spaces. The study determined that the perceptions of the principals and the staff of these new buildings were shared and sufficiently common for identification. The data collected from both groups of participants indicated the existence of three shared themes particular to this case study: improved student behaviors, improved staff and student morale, and a lack of belief that the new buildings had more positively impacted student achievement than had the old buildings. Additionally, data collected from participants in this study seemed to represent acknowledgement of a relationship between sustainable design elements and student achievement as well as student and staff behaviors. All respondents in both interview groups agreed that the amount of natural light incorporated into the design of the building had a positive impact on both student and staff behaviors, indicating that it may have positively impacted student achievement. At all three locations, participants expressed a shared belief that natural light had affected their overall performance, their individual moods, and, in some cases, their ability to maintain their levels of performance as the year progressed. Other factors mentioned by all participants as having had a positive impact included the following: open space in classrooms and hallways, the high ceilings and sense of openness in all the buildings, and enhanced safety and security features present in the buildings. All of the data collected from the participants in this research study led to the conclusion of the researcher that design elements such as natural lighting and climate controlled HVAC systems, as well as wide, open hallways and shared student spaces, do positively impact student behaviors and student and staff attitudes and behaviors.

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A High Performance School Case Study: Northern Guilford Middle School
Koh, B., & Nicklas, M. (2007).

This case study will introduce detailed information of each green strategy, for Northern Guilford Middle School, and how comprehensive strategies are well integrated into the project to stay within the budget.

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A study into the effects of light on children of elementary school age - A case of daylight robbery
Hathaway, W. E., Hargreaves, J.A., Thompson, G.W., & Novitsky, D. (1992).

Based on a review of the literature and a pilot study conducted from 1981 to 1985, a study was carried out that examined physical development and school performance effects of different lighting systems on elementary students. Students’ dental health, growth and development, attendance, and academic achievement were examined under four different types of lighting: (a) full spectrum fluorescent lamps, (b) full spectrum fluorescent lamps with ultraviolet light enhancements, (c) cool white fluorescent lamps, and (d) high pressure sodium vapor lamps. Data on 327 students, in Grade 4 at the end of the 1986-87 school year, were collected at the start and at the conclusion of the study, which spanned two years. The results indicated that over the two year period, students under full spectrum fluorescent lamps with ultraviolet supplements developed fewer dental cavities and had better attendance, achievement, and growth and development than students under other lights. Students under the high pressure sodium vapor lamps had the slowest rates of growth and development as well as the poorest attendance and achievement. On the basis of the findings of this study it was concluded that lights have important non-visual effects on students who are exposed to them on a regular basis in classrooms.

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A Sustainable and Holistic Approach to Design and Construction.
Bobodilla, L. (2010). 76 (4)

Building energy-efficient school facilities is not just about being "green." It is about providing high-performance facilities that are safe, healthy, and conducive to learning. It is also about building facilities that are cost-effective from their inception and in the long term. Many school districts are working under ever-tightening budgets, so reduced operating costs are welcomed. With careful planning, facilities and construction departments can build schools that encourage learning, reduce long-term operating costs, and lessen the effect on the environment while controlling up-front construction costs. The keys are including staff as active participants in the process and using a holistic approach to facility design. Guilford County Schools in North Carolina is an example of a district that was able to build a high-performance school that continually saves money. Northern Guilford Middle School is a $20.7 million facility serving 1,030 students. At two years old, it is beginning to show the long-term benefits of energy efficiency with lower electric bills and reduced water use. The school district wanted to use taxpayer dollars wisely while building a sustainable facility and creating a three-dimensional learning experience for students. During the planning and construction of Northern Guilford, the district's facilities staff worked with the architects to develop a holistic design for the school, detailing how the lighting, heating, cooling, and other systems would work together in the building. School districts can construct efficient buildings and lower energy expenses without greater up-front costs. This article offers some points school districts should remember as they develop plans to build high performance schools.

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A visioning process for designing responsive schools
Sanoff, H. (2001).

This manual presents guidance for creating a constructive dialogue between school officials and the surrounding community on the design of community schools that contribute to enhancing educational quality. The benefits of community participation are addressed as are descriptions of the principle parts of the participation process, including strategic planning, goal setting, and long term planning. Finally, the manual presents the Charrette process as a method for generating design ideas.

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